Wednesday, May 2, 2012

The first tick of the season!!

Yep, it's that time of the year again! Just found the first tick of the season on one of out cats. Tha little bugger was still crawling in the top of the cat's fur, which means it had gotten on to him very recently, probably the shrubs right behind our house!
I always thought ticks moved slow, so I was surprised at how fast this one, an adult, could move! Lesson learned. I also was surprised at how flat this one was; as thin as a sheet of paper.


Time to start up our tickroutines again.
What I do in the field is, after I have crossed an area, which might be home to ticks, such as bushes, shrubs or tall grass, I look for a treestub, rock or small hill, step up and check my pants to check for crawly critters. Somehow these buggers are much more visible this way, because the light "up there" is better. I did catch quite a few of them like that even befor they get the chance to get under my skin.
When I, or we, get home I/we leave as much gear as possible outside; bags, pouches, boots and jacket. I check and/or clean them up, when the light is good, mostly the next day.
After that I/we head for the batchroom, strip off the clothes and keep those seperate from the rest. We then do the tickcheck, checking each other for spots that weren't there previously. Special attention goes to those dark and warm spot, such as the groin- and loinarea, armpits, bellybutton and behind the ears.
So far I had only one in 6 years, my son 2 and my youngest daughter too. A tip I got was to stick the tick between some tape, write the date on that and toss the thing in the freezer. This way you have the actual tick present should symptoms of an illness develop. Also note the person, date and place where you found the tick in a notebook and check the area of the body where the tick was found regularly.

Some usefull links;
In Sweden; http://www.fasting.nu/
International: http://www.emedicinehealth.com/ticks/article_em.htm

This is what we do. It is just a piece of advice. When in doubt always go for professional medical attention!
Take this little bugger serious, people! It can have a very big impact on you!

1 comment:

  1. Good advice, Ron!

    weekendwoodsman

    ReplyDelete